THE FOCUS

SELECTS: CURATED BY BRIAN EDMONDS

MAR. 16, 2018

NOTE: This is the first feature in a new blog series we've begun called "Selects". This is a space where we will publish online-only art exhibitions. We're pleased to kick off this new series with a show curated by Huntsville, Alabama based artist Brian Edmonds.


Brian Edmonds: Curatorial Statement

I selected these artists because of their use of various materials and methods to create a sense of place or environment. Each is exploring their medium in their own distinct way.

It is through color and pattern that Eric Cagley creates an abstract environment. Using cut acrylic, the paintings become more 3d than 2d. The pattern is reminiscent of a linoleum kitchen floor while the black painting reminds one of a flashlight being used to light a path or, a cracked door allowing the light to push into the darkness.

Eric Cagley, Blue Yellow, Acrylic on Canvas, 16 x 12 inches, 2015

Eric Cagley, Blue Yellow, Acrylic on Canvas, 16 x 12 inches, 2015

Eric Cagley, Sail, Acrylic on Canvas, 11 x 14 inches, 2015

Eric Cagley, Sail, Acrylic on Canvas, 11 x 14 inches, 2015

Christina Renfer Vogel’s interiors are familiar to us. A bedroom. A kitchen. Each appearing to be lived in, yet alone and isolated. Waiting for someone to take the kettle off the stove or turn the cover. The patterned wall lends itself to Vuillard while the hint of solitude is Hopper-esque.

Christina Renfer Vogel, Blue Room, Oil and Acrylic on Paper, 7 13/16 x 6 inches, 2017

Christina Renfer Vogel, Blue Room, Oil and Acrylic on Paper, 7 13/16 x 6 inches, 2017

Christina Renfer Vogel, Night Kitchen, Oil and Acrylic on Panel, 10 x 8 inches, 2016

Christina Renfer Vogel, Night Kitchen, Oil and Acrylic on Panel, 10 x 8 inches, 2016

Using the simplest of means, thread, a photo, fabric, bleach, dye, and paint, Cody Tumblin creates a sense of longing. One is looking through an opening into the night sky. Instead of the familiar interior, the viewer is interested in what lies in the unknown. He strikes the right balance, giving you just enough to contemplate and question, which is what all artists should hope for.

Cody Tumblin, Through the Trees, Dyed Cotton, Bleach, Thread, iPhone Photograph on Cotton, 8 x 10 inches, 2016

Cody Tumblin, Through the Trees, Dyed Cotton, Bleach, Thread, iPhone Photograph on Cotton, 8 x 10 inches, 2016

Cody Tumblin, Some Kind of Confusion Between the Earth and Sky, Dye and Water Color on Cotton, iPhone Photograph on Cotton, Bleach, Thread, 50 x 36 inches, 2017

Cody Tumblin, Some Kind of Confusion Between the Earth and Sky, Dye and Water Color on Cotton, iPhone Photograph on Cotton, Bleach, Thread, 50 x 36 inches, 2017

Emily Bivens uses intimate confines in which to engage the viewer. Within these spaces each creates their own narrative based on previous experiences. The use of both physical and psychological space is intriguing and thought provoking, but totally dependent on the viewer. In essence, the participant receives only as much as they are willing to give.

Emily Bivens, Embed - object, Live Feed Video, Projection, 2015 (*also seen in header image)

Emily Bivens, Embed - object, Live Feed Video, Projection, 2015 (*also seen in header image)

Emily Bivens, Semblance I - object, Live Feed Video, 2014

Emily Bivens, Semblance I - object, Live Feed Video, 2014

Sydni Gause’s work is less open ended. The space is constructed in a way to force a reaction. You are introduced to common archetypes as you navigate your way through the constructs, pondering the relationship of these to one another and to you. She resists the temptation to overwhelm the viewer with parlour tricks. The minimalist approach is her greatest ally.

Brian Edmonds, March 2018

Sydni Gause, Subverting The Gaze, Installation, 3-d Body Scan, Glass, Wood, Light Media, Neon, Bronze, Moving Blanket, Silk, 2017

Sydni Gause, Subverting The Gaze, Installation, 3-d Body Scan, Glass, Wood, Light Media, Neon, Bronze, Moving Blanket, Silk, 2017


Sydni Gause, Sisterhood Is Still Strong, Glass, Neon, Wood, Diamond Plate, 35 x 61 x 33 inches, 2016

Sydni Gause, Sisterhood Is Still Strong, Glass, Neon, Wood, Diamond Plate, 35 x 61 x 33 inches, 2016


Brian Edmonds (b.1974) is an artist living in Alabama. His recent shows include In the Pines (Huntsville), DUSK: Embossed (Manhattan/Saint Chamas, FR), The Black and White Project (Brooklyn), White Hours (Cyprus) and This Is How It Ends (Kaleva, MI). Brian’s work can be found throughout North America and Europe.
 
In 2012, Brian launched the online exhibition space Curating Contemporary. Since its inception, the site has hosted over 50 exhibitions. Brian’s writings and interviews can be found in the catalogue for Clayton Colvin’s Space Mountain as well as the online journal Figure/Ground Communication.

brianedmonds.com
curatingcontemporary.com

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