• Both/And

    acrylic on fabric over panel
    8" x 6"  |  2020

  • Save

    acrylic on fabric over panel
    16" x 12"  |  2020

  • Shoulds

    oil, fabric collage and spray paint on canvas over panel
    16" x 12"  |  2020

  • Sack

    oil on fabric over panel
    16" x 12"  |  2020

  • Edge

    oil on fabric over panel
    16" x 12"  |  2019

  • Field

    oil on canvas over panel
    16" x 12"  |  2019

  • Footnotes

    oil and acrylic on canvas
    96" x 74"  |  2019

  • Heaven

    oil and acrylic on canvas
    96" x 74"  |  2019

  • Hem

    ink, oil and spray paint on canvas over panel
    16" x 12"  |  2019

JODI HAYS The Red Arrow Gallery Website CV

Nashville, TN | Painting, Mixed Media, Drawing
Bio:

Jodi Hays (b. 1976, Hot Springs National Park, AR) is a painter whose work has been exhibited internationally including at the Wiregrass Museum, Michael Price Contemporary (Boston) and The Brooks Museum (Memphis). In addition to her work as a painter, Jodi was a founding member of COOP curatorial collective.

A native of Arkansas, she is the recipient of grants from Sustainable Arts Foundation, Tennessee Arts Commission, and the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation. She is a 2019 Finalist for the Hopper Prize. Her works are included in collections of the J. Crew Company (New York), Nashville International Airport, National Parks of America, Gordon College (MA), the Tennessee State Museum, among others. Residencies include The Cooper Union School of Art and Vermont Studio Center. Her work is documented in six exhibition catalogues, and has been positively reviewed in Art Forum International, the Nashville SceneBurnaway, and Sharon Butler’s Two Coats of Paint. She is represented by The Red Arrow Gallery (Tennessee) and Show and Tell (South Carolina).

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Statement:

My painting iconography carries a thread of “southern” vernacular and is partly influenced by having been raised in rural Arkansas. Hard-edged shapes interact with rounded/floral moves, inviting associations with an architecture of the American South- awnings, bead board, and weathered lumber, textiles but also digital mark making and the grid. The core iconography elucidates a conversation on abstraction and a generative, inexhaustible mark.

My painting practice is akin to note-taking or a method of organizing knowledge. Gridded systems become a scaffold for pictorial inclinations, be they abstract or related to landscape. Stripes generate a placement in pattern, repetition and seriality. Textiles, associated with warmth, the body, pattern and “home” inform the work.

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