• Alba

    Mixed media on panel
    54" x 48' x 4"  |  2016

  • Intersection Revisited

    Welded and galvanized steel, Portland concrete products, Acrylic paint, stains and clear coatings.
    118" x 24" x 16"  |  2010

  • Standing Beside the Mystery

    Mixed media on panel
    93.5" x 48" x 48"  |  2015

  • Wedged

    Welded and galvanized steel, Portland concrete products, Bronze acrylic paint with Tiffany Green patina.
    9' x 3' x 4'  |  2014

  • Sliped

    Mixed media on panel
    50" x 48" x7"  |  2016

  • Traveler

    Welded and galvanized steel, Portland concrete products, Bronze acrylic paint with Tiffany Green patina.
    22.75" x 18" x 22.5"  |  2016

  • Pretending To Be

    Welded and galvanized steel, Portland concrete products, Acrylic paint, stains and clear coatings.
    62" x 32" x 12.5"  |  2016

  • Red Head

    Welded and galvanized steel, Portland concrete products, Acrylic paint, stains and clear coatings.
    17" x 7" x 8"  |  2016

  • Landbuoy I

    Welded and galvanized steel, Portland concrete products, Acrylic paint, stains and clear coatings.
    11' x 2' x3'  |  2010

ROGER HALLIGAN Lee Hansley Gallery Website CV

Chattanooga, TN | Sculpture, Mixed Media, Drawing
Bio:

Roger Halligan has been creating sculpture since the mid-seventies. He received his
MFA with honors in Studio Arts from the University of Georgia in 1977. After graduation he joined the newly formed Exhibit Design Department at the North Carolina Zoological Park where he was involved in the design and construction of natural habitat exhibits for African and later, North American animals. He was instrumental in the development of techniques now used at that zoo in its construction of hardscape features such as faux rocks, waterfalls and faux trees. In 1993, he was awarded the State of North Carolina Governor’s Award for Excellence for his work in the design and construction of the Sonora Desert Exhibit. He left the zoo in 1992 to devote his time to his fine art work.

He has exhibited in both solo and group exhibitions and has won numerous awards and commissions. His sculpture is in public collections including the cities of Carrboro and Raleigh, NC and Chattanooga, TN. The North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching, Cullowhee; the Triad Regional Farmers Market in Colfax, NC, the Weatherspoon Museum at UNC-Greensboro, the Maitland Museum in Maitland, FL and the William King Museum in Abingdon, VA as well as the Kellogg Center of UNC - Asheville in Hendersonville, NC, also have his work in their permanent collections. Most recently his sculpture was included in the collection of Rock City, Lookout Mountain, GA. His work is privately collected and can be seen regularly at the Lee Hansley Gallery in Raleigh, NC.

Some of his other distinctions in the arts include guest curating the “Just Racin’ - Artists look at NASCAR” for the Green Hill Center for North Carolina Art and in 1997 was selected Artist in Residence at the North Carolina Zoological Park. Mr. Halligan is also a founding member and past president of the Tri State Sculptors Educational Association, Inc... and is currently the vice president of the Mid-South Sculpture Alliance as well as being member of the International Sculpture Center.

He formed Two Oaks Studio with his artist partner Jan Chenoweth and in 2007 was awarded an ArtsMove Chattanooga Grant to relocate their home and studio to Chattanooga, TN. The studio was re-named Chenoweth-Halligan Studios in 2010. A portfolio of his work can be found at www.rogerhalligan.com.

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Statement:

“My work is about boundaries, warnings and lies.”

My sculpture examines the interpretations of boundaries we encounter and how we relate to them. Cautionary markings are often combined with three dimensional forms to create physical objects that by their very nature indicate boundaries and warnings that, although ambiguous as to their nature, ask questions of the viewer regarding the nature of place and their interactions to it. I feel that by being aware of our imposed boundaries, including those self-imposed, and the potential lies associated with them, we can better understand ourselves and perhaps even approach knowing some truths.

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