• Infinite Hug

    acrylic on canvas
    14" x 9"  |  2020

  • Fox Tale

    acrylic on canvas
    10" x 8"  |  2020

  • Cyclops (Solo-Eye Giant)

    acrylic on canvas
    14" x 16"

  • Kissing Foot

    acrylic on canvas
    14" x 9"  |  2020

  • Smoker

    acrylic on canvas
    10" x 9"  |  2020

  • Teary Witch

    acrylic on canvas
    14" x 9"  |  2020

  • Lila You

    acrylic on canvas
    14" x 9"  |  2020

  • Teary Wizard

    acrylic on canvas
    14" x 9"  |  2020

  • Palm Reader

    acrylic on canvas
    14" x 9"  |  2020

JING QIN Website CV

Knoxville, TN | Painting, Drawing, Installation
Bio:

Jing Qin is an artist born in China. She holds an MFA in Painting and Drawing from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Her work has been featured in New American Paintings, Friend of the Artist, Studio Visit, 1314 Art Magazine (China), and YNGSPC. She has been an artist in residence at Vermont Studio Center and Field Plus residency program (Chongqing, China).

She has been included in the SPRING/BREAK art show, the curator driven art fair during Armory Arts Week NYC 2018, and has been nominated as the semifinalist for the emerging artist fellowship by Barnes Foundation, Art Sanctuary, partnering with Rush Arts Gallery in Philadelphia. Her recent exhibitions include a solo exhibition with Tinney Contemporary in Nashville, TN. She also has been featured in exhibitions at the Art Museum of Sichuan University and her work will be upcoming in a solo booth at the Hubei Natural History Museum, China (TBD).

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Statement:

The truth may reside behind absurdity. Fantasy may come from reality. Surrealism is more real than realism. My works do not come from my personal experience and surroundings alone but exist as a hybridization of Chinese scenarios and American daydreams. 

Though I am aware of being both the narrator and creator of my paintings, the narratives remain undefined. Instead, they are generated by my unconscious, then developed and formed by the experience of viewers. I set my characters in a flatness that I call a non-logical space. The ambiguity of their gender and skin tones make them abnormal, even uncanny. They seemingly engage in meaningless tasks while holding ordinary poses, blending the odd with the ordinary. 

This ambiguity comes from the supernatural being presented as the mundane, and vice versa. I’m interested in prompting viewers to call into question the limits of narration, making psychological realism and surreal flights of fancy indistinguishable.

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