• Expo Line

    acrylic on canvas
    36" x 48" x 2"  |  2017

  • Purple Line

    acrylic on canvas
    20" x 30" x 2"  |  2017

  • Expo Line II

    acrylic on canvas
    20" x 24" x 2"  |  2017

  • The 217

    acrylic on canvas
    20" x 24" x 2"  |  2017

  • Gold Line

    acrylic on canvas
    30" x 24" x 2"  |  2017

ERICA ENTROP Website CV

Knoxville, TN | Painting
Bio:

Erica Entrop was born in Roswell, New Mexico and graduated Cum Laude from the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque with her BFA. While attending the university, she participated in the Land Arts of the American West program through which she was able to being defining her own style working under the guidance of artists Erika Osborne and Bill Gilbert.

She now splits her time between her studios in Knoxville, TN USA and Havana, Cuba. The people and landscapes of Tennessee contrasting with that of Cuba provide many perspective and a variety of narratives; celebrating the identities of both the heart and music of Tennessee and the rhythms and joy of Cuba.

She has had an extensive artistic career having participated exhibitions across the country and Cuba. Her works have recently been included in the Premier edition of Blue Bee Magazine. In the past year she has participated in the 13th Havana Biannual and the 25th Romerias Festival showcasing her newest film works in collaboration with her partner, Cuban artist, Darwin Estacio Martinez

She lives and works in Havana.

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Statement:

My work is based on a series of images that I have captured while riding public transportation in Los Angeles, Havana, New York, and Knoville. As a commuter, I spend two to three hours a day on the bus or train and even longer waiting for their arrival. As I ride with the same people day after day, I observe these people going to the same places, never speaking or engaging with these familiar strangers.

All of us are on our own tracks, playing out individual narratives. I am drawn to certain people in this travel routine that seem almost like characters in a play, always having some element that was interesting or different about them. I started taking their pictures, secretly capturing moments from their lives. For me, the feeling is one of intrusion, of voyeurism. The viewer is being asked to look at and engage with these seemingly mundane moments rather than the social norm of casting a passing glance.

In many cases, there is an individual that is recognizing the audience, further dissolving the fourth wall and making the viewer a participant in this ordinary, but layered and textured moment of life.

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