• MMMM Tacos

    Acrylic on Canvas
    40" x 30"  |  2017

  • I Heart the Idea of Memphis

    Acrylic on Canvas
    36" x 36"  |  2017

  • Sometimes I Think About Gravy

    Acrylic on Paper
    24" x 18"  |  2015

  • I Would Marry Any Women Named Butter

    Acrylic on Paper
    24" x 18"  |  2015

  • Memphis Grouping 1

    Acrylic on Canvas
    Variable  |  2017

  • Memphis Grouping 2

    Acrylic on Canvas
    Variable  |  2017

  • Memphis Grouping 3

    Acrylic on Canvas
    Varible  |  2017

  • 2nd Generation Grouping

    Acrylic on Canvas
    Varible  |  2017

  • Daddy Missed My Birthday

    Acrylic on Paper
    24" x 18" each  |  2015

DWAYNE BUTCHER Davis Lusk Gallery Website CV

Memphis, TN | Painting
Bio:

Dwayne Butcher is a cultural producer living in Memphis, TN. He recently made his return home after a three-year hiatus in Baltimore, MD. Initially, Butcher was none too excited about returning to Memphis. But let’s face it, for Dwayne, Memphis is Home.

He has exhibited work in Paris, Helsinki, Milan, Amsterdam, Washington D.C., New York City, Los Angeles, Chonqing, China, and numerous others. He has been featured in articles focusing on his work and community art projects for the New York Times, The Washington Post, Hyperallergic, Art21, and Big, Red and Shiny. 

He curated 100 exhibitions at the P&H Center for the Arts in Memphis, TN as well as numerous exhibitions at the University of Memphis and Marshall Arts, and the Cheekwood Museum in Nashville, TN. He is the former editor of Number: Inc and contributes articles for a variety of local, regional, and national publications.

He is one of the world’s greatest Risk players and has won awards for his chicken wings. Dwayne spends a lot of time with his wife taking pictures of their worthless cat.

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Statement:

Butcher, a keen social observer and curator, is known for making insightful paintings and videos that comment on his life as a card-carrying citizen of the American South, often around issues of gender identity and classism. He chooses to embrace his redneck background as a way to enter the highbrow art world, relishing in contradictions that counter his southern masculine roots.

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