• No Look Past (install shot)

    basketballs, shoestrings
      |  2018

  • No Look Past (install shot)

    basketballs, shoestrings
      |  2018

  • No Look Past (install shot)

    basketballs, shoestrings
      |  2018

  • Street Vernacular

    metal, paint
    8' x 6'  |  2018

  • Give a shot, Get a Shot

    wood, plastic, wire
    5' x 3' x 1'  |  2018

  • Give a shot, Get a Shot (detail)

    wood, plastic, wire
    5' x 3' x 1'  |  2018

  • Basketbal Bloom (Kik)

    basketballs, shoestring
    4' x 4'  |  2018

  • Starting 5

    basketballs, human hair, wood, spray paint
    4' x 6' x 1'  |  2017

  • Starting 5

    basketballs, human hair, wood, spray paint
    4' x 6' x 1'  |  2017

BRANDON DONAHUE David Lusk Gallery Website CV

Nashville, TN | Painting, Sculpture, Mixed Media, Installation
Bio:

Brandon J. Donahue (born 1985, Memphis, Tennessee) is an artist working in painting, assemblage, and sculpture. Donahue received his B.S. from Tennessee State University and his M.F.A. from The University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Donahue has exhibited nationally and internationally including the 13th annual Havana Biennial in Matanzas, Cuba in 2019. He is represented by David Lusk Gallery in Nashville and Memphis, TN and Trager Contemporary in Charleston, SC. Donahue now lives and works in Nashville, TN.

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Statement:

My work embodies the transformational spirit of the vernacular. I intentionally complicate issues such as hip-hop, sports, and art history in order to offer new perspectives and associations for established symbols. I search for and collect objects and materials with a specific history. I then add to the history of the object by employing techniques such as airbrushing, spray painting, vacuum forming, or simply reassembling the object. Customizing and personalizing to me is a rite. I believe in the ability to transcend the original state and meaning of things. I see myself in the work and realize that I, too, have the potential to change.

Two art-making processes dominate my studio practice: spraying with either an airbrush or spray can and scavenging abandoned objects. There is an exceptional quality to my painting process. Airbrushing enables me to work in large and small-scale detail without my tool physically touching the surface. Layers of paint evenly re-coat the material without altering it's form. I collect mass-produced, publicly displayed, and abandoned urban forms like fallen street signs, basketballs, car-bumpers, and hubcaps.

As a result of my alchemy, I produce new artifacts out of older recognizable forms. My new artifacts are obviously not found in everyday life the way that I present them, so I challenge the viewer to see not only what is present, but what is represented.

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